Title On ice-releasing properties of rough hydrophobic coatings
Author Kulinich, S.A.; Farzaneh, M.
Author Affil Kulinich, S.A., Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, Department of Applied Sciences, Saguenay, QC, Canada. Other: U. S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory
Source Anti-icing and de-icing techniques, edited by M. Farzaneh and C.C. Ryerson. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 65(1), p.60- 64, . Publisher: Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ISSN: 0165-232X
Publication Date Jan. 2011
Notes In English. Based on Publisher- supplied data GeoRef Acc. No: 309981
Index Terms adhesion; adsorption; ice; mechanical properties; temperature; wind tunnels; centrifuge methods; deicers; durability; glaze ice; hydrophobic materials; low temperature; nanoparticles
Abstract In this work, ice repellency of rough hydrophobic coatings based on different materials and with different surface topographies is evaluated. The coatings were prepared either from a fluoropolymer incorporated with nanoparticles or by etching aluminum alloy substrate followed by further hydrophobization of the rough surface via an organosilane monolayer adsorbed from solution. This allowed comparing the ice- releasing performance of rough surfaces with high water contact angles (~150-153°) and different dynamic hydrophobicities and mechanical properties. Artificially created glaze ice, similar to naturally occurring glaze, was accreted on the surfaces by spraying supercooled water microdroplets in a wind tunnel at subzero temperature. The ice adhesion strength was evaluated by spinning the samples in a centrifuge at constantly increasing speeds until ice detachment occurred. The results showed that, after several icing-deicing cycles, the more robust surfaces prepared by etching the aluminum substrate maintained their ice-releasing properties better, compared to their counterparts based on nanoparticle- incorporated fluoropolymer. The effect of the dynamic hydrophobicity of the coatings was also examined, clearly demonstrating that the surface with low dynamic hydrophobicity is not ice-repellent, although it demonstrates large values of water contact angle.
URL http://hdl.handle.net/10.1016/j.coldregions.2010.01.001
Publication Type journal article
Record ID 65006871